Sri Lanka

Iranamadu
Vase planted by Isabelle Jacobs, Priyankara, Thusitha Bodikotuwa, Damith, one local Iranamadu fisherman and two Sri Lankan Army officials, Aug. 8, 2015

“This vase was planted in the tank-lake of Iranamadu in Northern Sri Lanka. It was quite a challenge to get it there as the vase had to be cemented first and dropped into the deep waters of the tank, but was not cemented when it was handed over to me.   In my home country, this would not be so much of a challenge, but as a foreigner in an unknown country, it was.

With the blessings of the Guru, Nina Liffers – a friend who planted vases in Sri Lanka as well, gave me contact info of a local person – Priyankara – who was prepared to cement the vases. I met him in the blessed place of Anuradhapura, where the vases were handed over, cemented and given back to me.  Then, my own Sri Lankan contact – Thusitha Bodikotuwa (contact via Prashant in Deer Park) – and his friend Damith, provided a car and their driving assistance to make the journey form Anuradhapura up North to Iranamadu Tank for the actual planting.   So, after an hour detour through a dense part of rainforest around the tank, we arrived at a part of the tank that was not dried up. And, we even saw some fisherman boats … ! The access to the boats however, was duly monitored by the Sri Lankan Army. We then clearly informed them about the Peace Vase Project, showed them the cemented vase and the project-website (thank you internet on iPhone!).

And they decided to help us.  They walked us up to the only fisherman present, who – also after being informed about the project – was willing to take us onto the tank to be able to drop the vase in deep waters.   The journey took us about two and a half hours to the planting location, which is situated smack in the military area, where until May 2009, there was still a civil war going on. In other words: the area needed some blessings!   Once arrived, we noticed that due to the dry season, there was no water in the tank-area were the vase was intended to be planted. Afterwards, this was actually a very good thing, because if the vase had been planted on that location whilst water was actually there, in dry season it would definitely have manifested on the dry surface and could have been taken out, which of course is not the aim.”

Note: * Priyankara and Tushita both work for an organization called Sevalanka (www.sevalanka.org). Sevalanka Foundation is a Sri Lankan development organization that enhances the capacity of disadvantaged rural communities to identify and address their own development needs. Through their own professionals and their links with other service providers, they coordinate training and support services that contribute to the economically viable, socially just and ecologically sustainable development of Sri Lanka.

Sevalanka, a registered non-profit, works with two “daughter organizations” to provide an integrated and complementary package of services. Sewa Finance is a registered microfinance institution that provides financial services to community organizations and rural entrepreneurs. Sewa Economic Development Company (SEDCO) is a social enterprise that focuses on fair trade, value chain investments and enterprise development services.